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THE ATHEIST AND THE ACORN

By
Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea
1661 - 1720


NOTE:  Words and spelling are Seventeenth century.  ( i.e. --- casual = by chance,  mast = acorn,  stay = support )

&/\&/\&

MEthinks the World is oddly made,

And ev'ry thing's amiss,

A dull presuming Atheist said,

As strech'd he lay beneath a Shade;

And instanced in this:
 

Behold, quoth he, that mighty thing,

A Pumpkin, large and round,

Is held but by a little string,

Which upwards cannot make it spring,

Or bear it from the Ground.
 

Whilst on this Oak, a Fruit so small,

So disproportion'd grows;

That, who with Sence surveys this All,

This universal Casual Ball,

Its ill Contrivance knows.
 

My better Judgment wou'd have hung

That Weight upon a Tree,

And left this Mast, thus slightly strung,

'mongst things which on the Surface sprung,

And small and feeble be.
 

No more the Caviller cou'd say,

Nor farther Faults decry;

For, as he upwards gazing lay,

An Acorn, loosn'd from the Stay,

Fell down upon his Eye.
 

Th' offended Part with Tears ran o'er,

As punish'd for the Sin:

Fool !    had that Bough a Pumpkin bore,

Thy Whimseys must have work'd no more,

Nor Scull had kept them in.
 

&/\&/\&

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